Page of Honor

Lafayette Police Department

Commemorating those who made the ultimate sacrifice to the citizens of Lafayette

Simon Chaission
Simon Chaission
 

 

A part of America died on July 11, 1926, when Police Officer Simon Chaission was killed in the line of duty. Simon Chaission was killed near Vermillion Street and the railroad tracks while participating in a manhunt for a man who killed two railroad employees. Born in Scott, Louisiana, in 1877, Officer Chaission served with honor since 1921. At the time of his death, Officer Chaission was survived by his wife, Lea Breaux Chaission, five daughters, Mrs. J.H. Hawkins, Mrs. A.J. Hanes, Mrs. Clebe Stutes, Mrs. S.J. Folory, and Bernadette Chaission, and two sons, Robert and Simon Chaission Jr. This memorial commemorates the ultimate sacrifice to the citizens of Lafayette.

Leroy King
Leroy King

A part of America died on May 20, 1959, when Detective Sergeant Leroy King was killed in the line of duty. Leroy King joined the Lafayette Police Department in 1955. A native of Lafayette, Louisiana, Sergeant King was born in 1912. Sergeant King served four years before his death on May 20, 1959. On that day, he and a second officer were shot to death while answering a disturbance call on Spring Street. During the ensuing gun battle the suspect was shot and killed. At the time of Detective King’s death surviving family members included: wife Hilda Rucker King; son, Jerry King; daughter, Marlene King. This memorial commemorates his ultimate sacrifice to the citizens of Lafayette.

Harold Abadie
Harold Abadie

A part of America died on May 20, 1959, when Captain Harold Abadie was killed in the line of duty. Harold Abadie was born in Carencro, Louisiana, in 1916. He became a Lafayette police officer in 1948 and served faithfully for eleven years. On May 20, 1959, Captain Abadie was also killed while responding to the same disturbance call with Sergeant Leroy King. At the time of his death surviving family members included: wife, Daisy Abadie, daughter, Carolyn Abadie McFarland. This memorial commemorates the ultimate sacrifice to the citizens of Lafayette.

John "Rocky" Langlinais
John "Rocky" Langlinais

A part of America died on July 22, 1960, when Captain John "Rocky" Langlinais was killed in the line of duty. John Langlinais, a native of Youngsville, Louisiana, was born in 1926. He joined the Lafayette Police Department in 1950, quickly rising to the rank of Captain. On July 22, 1960, Captain John Langlinais was shot and killed while executing an arrest warrant at the downtown bus station on Lee Avenue. The suspect was shot and killed by back-up officers. At the time of his death surviving family members included: wife; Irene Langlinais; son, Charles Langlinais, and daughter Debbie Langlinais Gondron. This memorial commemorates his ultimate sacrifice to the citizens of Lafayette.

Edward Burch
Edward Burch

A part of America died on January 5, 1969, when Police Officer First Class Edward Burch was killed in the line of duty. Edward Burch was shot and killed on January 5, 1969, while transporting a prisoner from the intersection of Eight Street and Charles Street. Born in Port Barre, Louisiana, in 1919, Officer Burch honorably served the Lafayette Police Department from 1962 until his death. The suspect in this incident was apprehended a short time later and is incarcerated in the Louisiana State Penitentiary. At the time of his death surviving family members included: wife, Annie Mea Romero Burch. This memorial commemorates the ultimate sacrifice to the citizens of Lafayette.

 
The Badge

A badge is a symbol, of trust we can't abuse
it is a source of power, we should never misuse
we must not dishonor, our selves or other men
we harm all those around us, when we chose to sin
we must never tarnish, such a noble shield
no matter what we're offered, we can't succumb and yield
we must never weaken , and join the other side
we can't give in to money, nor let it be our guide
a badge is a symbol, which must be worn with pride
it must remain unsullied, with not a thing to hide
we must not be tempted to use, to use it in a way
which would bring harm to others, by what we do or say
the oath that we all took, is one we can not break
those word we must remember, for there is much at stake
a badge is a symbol, of trust we can't abuse
it is a source of power, we never should misuse.

Marshal Earl J. "Nicky" Picard
City Court of Lafayette, LA.